1. I’m gonna do an article about ghost tours around Halloween

    I have a bad going-to-ghost-tours habit that is totally shameful considering I’m an actual occultist and ghost tours are like the direct-to-video horror movie sequels of the paranormal world.

    But I loooooove them. And I want to share what it’s like being someone who can actually pick up on stuff and going on those tours, some of the common dangers and pratfalls of ghost tours, and my general feelings on the “ghost industry”.

     

  2. satanictantric:

    da-at-ass:

    People knock the tumblr pagan community, and we may have our share of drama, but last night I made a Witchvox account to list MPV there. And, wow. The outright “no Christians no Satanists!” rule made me blink. I’ve been on here with the broad mix of all sorts of pagans, including christopagans and…

    Yeah, I wanted to register some stuff there back in the 90’s when it was actually relevant, and then I saw the “no Christians/Satanists” in the rules and was appalled.

    THE FUCK IS KABBALAH THEN? THIS ISN’T BLACK AND WHITE.

    I mean good lord you can’t go anywhere with CM without dealing with angelic/infernal stuff. Probably little if anything on Witchvox is “pure” by that standard.

    Then I saw some group dedicated to the Archangel Michael and just had it with that site

    Yeah, and there’s so many syncretic practices… I don’t know. I’m not sure why the emphasis to keep Christians out, wouldn’t they not want to be in the directory anyway? As for Satanists… *wince* I know a lot of witches/pagans take a lot of pains to make sure people know that they, as individuals, are not Satanists and don’t devil-worship, but I hate this whole “shaming Satanists so that we can loudly proclaim none of us are Satanists” approach. They just perpetuate the idea that there’s something wrong with Satanism and such, that such practices are evil, that it’s “THOSE GUYS” that do human sacrifice and blood orgies or whatever, “NOT US.”

    As for their stance on Kabbalah, no idea. They don’t have a “no Muslims” rule, no “no Jews” rule… just “no Christians and Satanists.” *heavy sigh*

    MPV’s listed there now, anyway. If anyone’s stuck on that site looking for MPV’s type of material, now they know where it is. I don’t think it’s breaking rules but it’s a bit hard to tell, they had a rule that you had to have some earth-based faith to be on the site, which totally ignores secular witches. I don’t know that my faith is even “earth-based”. It’s more spiritually-grounded than ecological. But I don’t even know what earth-based even means.

     
  3. deathandmysticism:

    Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Handbook of Lunar Mansions and Talismans, 19th century

    Makin’ a note of Cartoon Sigil Mascot Dude.

    Source: http://www.library.upenn.edu/rbm/featured/mscoll952.html

    (via blackpaint20)

     

  4. People knock the tumblr pagan community, and we may have our share of drama, but last night I made a Witchvox account to list MPV there. And, wow. The outright “no Christians no Satanists!” rule made me blink. I’ve been on here with the broad mix of all sorts of pagans, including christopagans and satanists, for so long that I forgot how unaccepted they were elsewhere.

    As it is I wonder if MPV will end up not being “pagan or witchy” enough for them. There is an occult section so I parked MPV in that. Oddly there was no category for educational article based websites, the closest thing was websites that sell courses. But no specific demonology section.

    Also, when you change your password there, THEY EMAIL IT TO YOU IN PLAINTEXT.

    Anyway I don’t even know if anyone is on Witchvox anymore but I thought I’d reach out to that crowd to see if anyone would be interested in what MPV has got. I don’t know where other pagan/witchcraft/mage/demonolator directories are yet, I guess I’ll do some hunting.

     

  5. Magical Book Meme

    graycloak:

    abwatt:

    graycloak mentioned that he wanted a magical book meme to parallel the book meme that’s currently going around. So, here goes.

    What ten magical books have had an influence on your magical practice as you currently operate it?

    I got tagged! Fwee!

    I actually use research and reference materials and fiction just as much as “magical” books, since I tend to adapt stuff into my own work. So I’m sorta widening the goalposts here.

    1. Secret Symbols of the Rosicrucians - I found the diagrams and figures in this book early in my search for alchemical and hermetic understanding, and they have stuck with me for life.

    2. Lesser Key of Solomon - The Mathers translation was my first, but I’m currently favoring Peterson’s translation. But yeah, as my introduction to the demons I’d end up working with for thirteen years, it was pretty instrumental, much as I’ve never literally used its methods.

    3. Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner - Everyone has a first magic book when they’re first trying to learn what to do. This was mine. I got it because I couldn’t join a coven at the time and none of the traditions rang with me. I’m not a wiccan anymore but this book was my first step towards building my own tradition.

    4. The Book of Thoth - I jumped from Cunningham to this. It’s still my favorite Crowley material, he seems less like he’s putting on a show and more like he’s talking about what he’s passionate about. I like using the book as a meditational resource for the card deck, which is still one of my mainstays for readings.

    5. Illuminatus!/Schrödinger’s Cat Trilogy - I am cheating, but so was Robert Anton Wilson when he wrote these books. This series broke my brain so that I could think around corners.

    6. Astral Dynamics - This book taught me that I didn’t want to astral travel. It would be too much work.

    7. The Book of Grimoires - Instead of a grimoire collection per se, this explains the history of grimoires and gives some really interesting context to how grimoires were used and who used them. There are excerpts and translations, it’s sort of a “greatest hits” collection.

    8. The Dictionary of Demons - Lists most of the demons you’ll ever read about, most of the salient facts about them, and where to research more on them. It beats shuffling through five grimoires trying to track down that one detail.

    9. 777 - Crowley’s big book o’ correspondences. It always has That One Thing You’re Looking For.

    10. D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths - The reason why, as a kid, I wondered why everyone around me seemed to choose to worship this one super-ambiguous god when there were so many different ones to choose from. Later in life I would probably end up learning more than I wanted to know on the subject, but hey! Here I am. Semi-well-grounded in Greek mythology except for the sex-related bits that were edited out of a kids’ book. Still catching up on a few of those.

    Alright! I’m gonna tag… hellboundwitch and tifirion and stammsternenstaub! Woo-hoo!

     

  6. satanictantric:

    da-at-ass:

    satanictantric:

    da-at-ass:

    The problem is that even as a beginner, I would have found this frustrating. The tone is a bit pandering, the book assumes the beginner has never encountered any of this stuff or has never heard of any of this stuff, and that’s frustrating. Beginners want to feel smart. They want to feel like they…

    I honestly think that book WAS written for younger people, like ages 10-15-ish? A lot of people get into magic in their early teens or even preteens. Oberon has a “witch school” and, correct me if I’m wrong, it was open to all ages but geared specifically towards that age group.

    When I first got into magic, my “intro” book was High Magic by Frater U.D. It’s a little of everything within a mostly Thelemic/Chaos framework. I really liked it.

    Looks like the Grey School has a separate age slot for 11-17, and then adults. I’m gonna withhold judgment until I read more of the book, but the sheer amount of intro chapters had me skeptical. Usually that stuff is just stage dressing for the different contributors to each get an ego-pump, though. At eleven, I would have looked at some of this askance and then tried to find the “real” stuff, but it’s been my nature to just dive in where I wanted, and then sort myself out after. I am a terrible beginner, and I assume everyone else is.

    My first book was Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner and then I went straight from that to The Book of Thoth, as far as I recall. There were some books on magical symbols in-between, and then after Thoth I pretty much just shot uncut grimoires straight into my veins. I would have liked a book like GftAW but I’m not sure I would have been patient enough for the whole thing and I probably would have skipped straight to their chapter on demonology.

    Which about sums up my approach to articles. “Here’s how you summon a demon! Oh shit, you want to know how to detect energy. Let me write that up now that you’ve got a demon on the phone.” I swear I will put this in better order when I write the book.

    If it helps, I curse out pretty much every beginner book I read, so this can easily be a case of “it’s late at night and I am already frayed at the edges.”

    If you’re looking for a good beginners’ book to recommend on MPV, PLEASE check out High Magic I and II. It seems like everyone but me started with Donald Michael Kraig and complains about the lack of *good* modern beginners’ books, and no matter how much I try to pimp this one, it gets ignored - and it really deserves better than that. This is what I found at my local Borders (RIP) when I got started and this is what successfully introduced me.

    I think it would be particularly appropriate for the readers of MPV, because the first lesson teaches the LBRP and presents it as an invocation (which it really is), then the book moves on to breath/energy/yoga work, sensing energy and spirits, and then has you perform your first invocation of a planetary spirit. And YES, it does Goetia - surprisingly early on, in fact.

    Gon’ check it out, thanks!

     

  7. I WANT to Like Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard

    graycloak:

    I’m sorry you’re not taking to the book :(  I can tell you, though, as someone who had no real exposure to Magick pre Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, I really appreciated the foundation work it does in the beginning.

    Well… Scratch that - I didn’t appreciate it at the time, of course, heh.. but after being involved in the magickal community on Tumblr, and seeing people either throw around terms, or be afraid of terms, or diluting everything by saying it’s all the same, or trying to make themselves feel more important by saying X is superior to Y… that’s when I really started to appreciate the foundation work the Grimoire, and the early classes at the Grey School, put you though.

    A lot of it really is geared toward deprograming movie-sparkle misinformation and rebuilding with a more historical (but far less flashy) picture of Magick and the Magickal Community.

    But if you found it overly pedantic, I do apologize for the original suggestion :\

    Oh I’m still in the beginning, this will probably improve once I get into like, the real stuff. I am also super-frazzled tonight so I just wanted to grouse. Please don’t apologize, I knew the danger when I bought it - even a book I don’t like is educational because it helps me learn what I don’t like.

    But it’ll probably improve soon. I should go to bed soon anyway.

    (Source: da-at-ass)

     

  8. satanictantric:

    da-at-ass:

    The problem is that even as a beginner, I would have found this frustrating. The tone is a bit pandering, the book assumes the beginner has never encountered any of this stuff or has never heard of any of this stuff, and that’s frustrating. Beginners want to feel smart. They want to feel like they…

    I honestly think that book WAS written for younger people, like ages 10-15-ish? A lot of people get into magic in their early teens or even preteens. Oberon has a “witch school” and, correct me if I’m wrong, it was open to all ages but geared specifically towards that age group.

    When I first got into magic, my “intro” book was High Magic by Frater U.D. It’s a little of everything within a mostly Thelemic/Chaos framework. I really liked it.

    Looks like the Grey School has a separate age slot for 11-17, and then adults. I’m gonna withhold judgment until I read more of the book, but the sheer amount of intro chapters had me skeptical. Usually that stuff is just stage dressing for the different contributors to each get an ego-pump, though. At eleven, I would have looked at some of this askance and then tried to find the “real” stuff, but it’s been my nature to just dive in where I wanted, and then sort myself out after. I am a terrible beginner, and I assume everyone else is.

    My first book was Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner and then I went straight from that to The Book of Thoth, as far as I recall. There were some books on magical symbols in-between, and then after Thoth I pretty much just shot uncut grimoires straight into my veins. I would have liked a book like GftAW but I’m not sure I would have been patient enough for the whole thing and I probably would have skipped straight to their chapter on demonology.

    Which about sums up my approach to articles. “Here’s how you summon a demon! Oh shit, you want to know how to detect energy. Let me write that up now that you’ve got a demon on the phone.” I swear I will put this in better order when I write the book.

    If it helps, I curse out pretty much every beginner book I read, so this can easily be a case of “it’s late at night and I am already frayed at the edges.”

     

  9. I WANT to Like Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard

    The problem is that even as a beginner, I would have found this frustrating. The tone is a bit pandering, the book assumes the beginner has never encountered any of this stuff or has never heard of any of this stuff, and that’s frustrating. Beginners want to feel smart. They want to feel like they already have something when they’re starting. Many of them are jumping into this stuff because something has already happened to them, and they want to know what it is and how to deal with it. They don’t want three different introductions to the book, they don’t want to be treated like they’re a seven-year-old, they don’t want to be talked down to. They want to be acknowledged as having potential, and then they want to be let onto the path. I don’t know, there’s such a thing as being too welcoming - so much “welcome” and not enough “now let’s get to it”.

    It’s obvious this book was written in reaction to the resurgence in magic due to the rise of Harry Potter, and I think that was a wise move, but the tone is like… I don’t know. Like people who read about fiction wizards need to be held by the hand like first-years. Harry Potter was a first-year once and he slew a chunk of Voldemort then. The book was so exciting and engaging partially because Rowling understood that people at first-year Hogwarts age wanted to be taken seriously.

    Maybe this will improve once I get to later chapters. I want to know what’s in this book so I’ll know if I should recommend it to MPV’s readers. I wish Cunningham were still alive. He could have contributed so much to this. He had a really good approach for those new to the arts.

     
  10. misterbeaudry:

    Posting a bunch of original drawings and limited prints at misterbeaudry.bigcartel.com tomorrow! Limited prints as low as 20$ and a couple originals as low as 45$. Free patches with every purchase ;) #mondaymondaymonday (at Colonial Park Cemetery)

    Some of you peeps will love his stuff, I’m sure.

    blackpaint20, you might be interested in some of this person’s work!

     
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